Ralph Bakshi – Heavy Traffic (1973)

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Ralphbakshi.com wrote:
Ralph Bakshi’s follow-up to Fritz the Cat is a mixture of live action and animation. It is a downbeat look at the urban life of a young New Yorker, depressed by the sights and sounds around him, who finds refuge at a drawing board. Along with Fritz ,Coonskin and American Pop , this film stands as a testament to Bakshi’s determined and most welcome effort to create personal animated features aimed at an intelligent, adult audience. Continue reading Ralph Bakshi – Heavy Traffic (1973)

Wes Anderson – Isle of Dogs (2018)

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Quote:
Visionary director Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs tells the story of Atari Kobayashi, 12-year-old ward to corrupt Mayor Kobayashi. When all the canine pets of Megasaki City are exiled to a vast Trash Island, Atari sets off in search of his bodyguard-dog, Spots. With the assistance of his newfound mongrel friends, he begins an epic journey that will decide the fate and future of the entire Prefecture. Continue reading Wes Anderson – Isle of Dogs (2018)

Ralph Bakshi – American Pop (1981)

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A 1981 American animated musical drama film starring Ron Thompson and produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi. The film tells the story of four generations of a Russian Jewish immigrant family of musicians whose careers parallel the history of American popular music.
The majority of the film’s animation was completed through rotoscoping, a process in which live actors are filmed and the subsequent footage is used for animators to draw over. However, the film also uses a variety of other mixed media including water colors, computer graphics, live-action shots, and archival footage.
– WIKIPEDIA Continue reading Ralph Bakshi – American Pop (1981)

Lawrence Jordan – The Apoplectic Walrus (2015)

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Joanna wanted a film on the collages of Max Ernst, and I wanted to make a tribute to the two men who most influenced my film work at the beginning: Max Ernst (collage) and Luis Bunuel (surrealism in cinema).I had written a book of about 100 pages in the surrealist tradition of ‘automatic writing’, which I called the CLOUD JOURNAL. I thought I could marry some of the text of the journal with the collages of Ernst’s UNE SEMAINE DE BONTE, along with bits of my own animation.So I shot the film on day one of the Ernst collage novel (example: lion), and used the first 16 pages of my journal. I enlisted my friend and collaborator, Leroy Clark, to narrate and engineer the sound. We finished up digitally, then on 16mm film (the original format).I have nothing esoteric to say about this film, except to explain the title: it is a tribute to Luis Bunuel. There is no walrus in the film, as there is no dog in LE CHIEN ANDALOU. Continue reading Lawrence Jordan – The Apoplectic Walrus (2015)